Words of Wisdom from Seth

Apparently there is someone out there blogging as Seth (perhaps Seth?) who is saying things I should have thought of or am thinking of or am glad to be pointed in the direction of thinking. Here are just a few of the more recent nuggets of wisdom.

A friend asked me the other day, “…given the sorry state of so much in the world, what’s possible to look forward to?”

The state isn’t sorry. It’s wide open.

from “The Chance of a Lifetime” at Seth’s Blog

As soon as you accept that just about everything in our created world is only a few generations old, it makes it a lot easier to deal with the fact that the assumptions we make about the future are generally wrong, and that the stress we have over change is completely wasted.

from “It’s Always Been This Way” at Seth’s Blog

Is the weather the only thing you can think to ask about? A great question is one you can ask yourself, one that disturbs your status quo and scares you a little bit.

The A part is easy. We’re good at answers. Q, not so much.

from “Q&A” at Seth’s Blog

How little can I get away with?


How much can I do?

Surprisingly, they both take a lot of work. The closer you get to either edge, the more it takes. That’s why most people settle for the simplest path, which is do just enough to remain unnoticed.

No one can maximize on every engagement, every project, every customer and every opportunity. The art of it, I think, is to be rigorous about where you’re prepared to overdeliver, and not get hooked on doing it for all…

from “The More or Less Choice” at Seth’s Blog

A wrapped present is transformed when it is opened. Anticipation turns into information, and frequently, one is worth far more than the other.

Too often, we overlook the value of imagination and dreams and the _____. We figure, as marketers or managers or leaders or engineers that all we have to do is meet the spec, fill in the blank and we can prove we did a good job.

Often, though, the story a person tells herself is worth more that the object itself.

from “Gift Wrapped” at Seth’s Blog

[T]he purpose of an elevator pitch is to describe a situation or solution so compelling that the person you’re with wants to hear more even after the elevator ride is over.

from “No one ever bought anything in an elevator” at Seth’s Blog